Bad news for immigrants, some will lose their green cards

Bad news regarding ‘the papers’, thousands of immigrants will lose their green cards. This would occur due to delays from the...

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  • Bad news regarding ‘the papers’, thousands of immigrants will lose their green cards.
  • This would occur due to delays from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
  • Now, the life in the United States of thousands of immigrants residing in the country is in danger.

Bad news for immigrants: Thousands of immigrants would lose their green cards or permanent residence cards due to delays in the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

According to a federal official who talked to The Wall Street Journal, there would be at least 100,000 permanent residence cards that the USCIS will not be able to process during this fiscal year. This is why the life in the United States of thousands of immigrants residing in the country will be in danger.

Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards

Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards
Photo: Shutterstock

At least 100,000 green cards of those awarded for employment could be compromised by the delays that USCIS has had in its operations due to the coronavirus pandemic. The situation could affect 1.2 million immigrants living on US soil, especially a high percentage who serve in the technology sector.

“The situation complicates what has already been a one-year wait for many of the 1.2 million immigrants … who have been waiting in line to become permanent residents of the US,” The Wall Street Journal reported.

Difficult to reach the goal in two months

Supreme Court immigrants residence Donald Trump Joe Biden green card
Photo: Shutterstock

The New York media report indicates that in October 2020, USCIS already began the work of processing 120,000 green cards more than the 140,000 it usually issues each year. Now, with at least two months remaining until the end of the fiscal year, they anticipate that it will not be able to meet the goal of responding to all the requests they have received.

Even so, no specific data has been offered on the number of people affected. “Recent data is not available on exactly how many employment-based green cards have been processed,” the report states.

Taking forever to issue permanent residences

Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards
PHOTO Getty Images

According to official data, on average, the approval of a permanent residence card for immigrants who want to stay in the United States would take about 10.5 months, which would represent two months more than last year, reported the NY Journal.

“In some extreme cases, green card applications have been waiting up to five years, data show,” the Wall Street Journal reported in its report, adding that State Department official Charlie Oppenheim estimates that they will close in September with nearly 100,000 unprocessed green cards.

How do you deal with mountains of work?

Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards
PHOTO Getty Images

Ur Mendoza Jaddou was recently confirmed by the Senate as the new director of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. He only took office on August 3, but he will have to contend with an agency plagued with problems, especially because of its limited processing capacity.

“As a proud American and the daughter of immigrants, I am deeply honored to return to USCIS as Director. I look forward to leading a team of dedicated public servants who are committed to honoring the aspirations of people like my parents and millions of others who are proud to choose this country as their home. USCIS embodies the spirit of welcoming the US as a land of opportunity for all and a place where possibilities come true, ”he said in a statement issued when he arrived at the leadership office.

Much work ahead

Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards
PHOTO Getty Images

Of course, in the text he assumed his commitment. “As the director of USCIS, I will continually work to ensure that our nation’s legal immigration system is administered in a way that honors our heritage as a host nation and beacon of hope to the world, reduce unnecessary barriers, and support the modernization of our agency ”.

“I am excited about the work that lies ahead and I am ready to get down to business and implement Secretary Mayorkas’s goals and the Biden-Harris Administration’s priorities to ensure that USCIS work lives up to the highest standards. values ​​of our nation ”, concluded Ur Mendoza Jaddou.

Three Mexicans sue DHS for denying their permanent residences

For the young Mexican, the need for legalization must cross the border of the
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Just over a month ago, three Mexican Colorado residents sued the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS in English) for rejecting the application for permanent residence that each of the immigrants made, and they assured that this decision was “illegal,” according to their lawyers.

The legal complaint was filed by the spouses Norma Cisneros Zavala and Álvaro Pérez González, whose children and grandchildren are US citizens; and by María Salazar Manzo, married to a US citizen and mother of two children born in the US, reported the Efe agency.

Mexicans sue DHS after denying them permanent residence

Mexicans sue DHS
Photo: Getty.

The lawsuit filed in Colorado District Court comes after USCIS declared the immigrants’ applications inadmissible because they did not meet the 10-year sentence established by the Immigration Law, which penalizes to immigrants who enter illegally or stay longer than their visas allow.

Each of the three immigrants was living in the United States for more than a year in an undocumented way more than a decade ago, and they left the country. Cisneros and Pérez left the US in 2008, while Salazar returned to Mexico in 1999.

Immigrants obtained a tourist visa

Immigrants obtained a tourist visa
Photo: Twitter.

Under the Immigration Law, the exits of Mexicans triggered the 10-year ban, immigration lawyer Luis Cortés, who represents immigrants, explained to Efe.

However, each of these immigrants applied for and obtained a tourist visa, which allowed them to return to the United States before the end of the 10-year waiting period of punishment, according to the lawsuit filed last week. The husbands submitted their applications to adjust their status in 2019, as did Salazar.

More than 10 years of punishment have passed

Mexicans sue DHS
Photo: Getty.

USCIS said in 2020 that the 10-year sentence immigrants would have to serve stopped when they returned to the U.S., making them ineligible for permanent residence. This despite the fact that since his departure more than 10 years have passed in the case of the spouses, and more than 20 years in that of Salazar.

“The text of the Law … reads more naturally as a categorical barrier to admissibility that applies for 10 years after the non-citizen left, but not after that,” the lawsuit argues, adding that “regarding comings or other events during that 10-year period, the statute is silent. ” Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards.

The post Bad news of the papers, they warn who would lose their green cards appeared first on Hispanic World.

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