UNUSUAL! The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

It is incredible, but it is true. The names of the list of Atlantic storms have been finished and they are forced to start using the Gree...

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  • It is incredible, but it is true. The names of the list of Atlantic storms have been finished and they are forced to start using the Greek alphabet
  • Tropical Storm Wilfred, the last with a traditional name, formed about an hour before Alpha
  • Wilfred, Alpha and Beta set records as the 21st, 22nd and 23rd named storms to form earlier during the Atlantic season.

It is incredible, but it is true. The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they are forced to start using the Greek alphabet.

The historic and “crazy” Hurricane season The Atlantic received a European twist on Friday after meteorologists ran out of traditional names and began turning to the Greek alphabet for subtropical storm Alpha. And that cyclone in a geographically infrequent place quickly reached Portugal.

But there is still more. Active Atlantic is putting the Greek alphabet to the test after Tropical Storm Beta formed on Friday afternoon. This is just the second time that meteorologists from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) from the United States have had to use names from the Greek alphabet. The first time was in 2005.

Tropical Storm Wilfred, the last with a traditional name, formed about an hour before Alpha, prompting the hurricane center to tweet: “Take out the Greek alphabet.”

UNUSUAL!  The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

Photo: Twitter

And it wasn’t long before they used it again, when a tropical depression in the western Gulf of Mexico became Tropical Storm Beta. There are three storms that formed in a period of about six hours.

“It’s crazy,” said University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy. “It’s through the roof. Breaking records became a joke. “

Wilfred, Alpha and Beta set records as the 21st, 22nd and 23rd named storms to form earlier during the Atlantic season, having emerged weeks earlier than in 2005.

UNUSUAL!  The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

Photo: National Hurricane Center website

Alpha is weird in another way too. It is located in an area where storms generally do not form. That’s something so unusual that it barely appears on the hurricane center’s storm tracking map, which focuses on the Americas. Only the first two letters of her name can be seen and it is expected to dissipate in less than a day.

But Alpha fits in with the rest of this season. About half of the storms this active hurricane season have lasted a few days and have been fairly weak, McNoldy said. For example: Vicky appeared suddenly and dissipated in the same way. And of the 22 storms, only two of them – Laura and Teddy, who remains active – reached at least Category 3 hurricanes, which is also unusual, McNoldy added.

The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and there is still more to see

McNoldy said environmental conditions reduce winds at high altitudes enough for storms to be created, but not enough for them to strengthen or survive long. La Niña, which is a cooling pattern of some parts of the equatorial Pacific and changes the climate around the world, has been a factor that has made some parts of the Atlantic more active. But it doesn’t explain the formation of Alpha, she added.

McNoldy doesn’t see a connection between human-caused climate change and large numbers of storms.

Just as a reminder, the hurricane center tweeted the 24 letters of the Greek alphabet and crossed out Alpha to indicate it was already used.

McNoldy joked that after that there is no official list of names, but that the Russian alphabet is available.

La Niña forms in 2020 and worse hurricanes and forest fires are forecast

La Niña 2020. What was missing in this 2020 of coronavirus, hurricanes and wildfires… La Niña is back and ‘promises’ to be more relentless than ever.

Although it is not common for the phenomenon known as La Niña to happen for two consecutive winters, he had to return in 2020 to ‘do his thing’.

This was confirmed by meteorologists from the National Atmosphere and Ocean Administration (NOAA, for its acronym in English) this Thursday, who reported that La Niña formed and will last for several months, according to the news agency The Associated Press.

In accordance with USA Today, La Niña could give an additional boost to the already active hurricane season in the Atlantic, as well as extend the disastrous wildfire season in the west.

La Niña is the cold counterpart of El Niño and is a natural cooling of the Pacific waters, which alters weather patterns throughout the planet.

It generally creates drier conditions in the southern United States and rainier in the northwest Pacific and western Canada.

Indonesia, the Philippines, northeastern South America, and South Africa often see more rainfall.

Last year’s La Niña was unusually brief, lasting from November to February.

This year’s should last longer, until the end of winter.

But Mike Halpert, deputy director of NOAA’s Center for Climate Predictions, said it will almost certainly be weak.

Texas A&M University agricultural economist Bruce McCarl said La Niña is often bad for Texas and the surrounding region.

US production of most crops – except corn – generally declines during La Niña years, McCarl says.

The Girl 2020

PHOTO Twitter

La Niña forms in 2020 and worse hurricanes and forest fires are forecast

The last powerful La Niña, several years ago, caused extensive damage to crops and Texas suffered a devastating drought, he said.

On average, La Niña years hurt the GDP of the United States and China by about 0.3 percentage points, but cause growth in India, New Zealand and South Africa, according to Kamiar Mohaddes, an economist at the University of Cambridge.

“La Niña may contribute to increased Atlantic hurricane activity by weakening wind shear over the Caribbean Sea and the tropical Atlantic Basin, allowing storms to develop and intensify,” said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the NOAA Climate Prediction Center, according to USA Today.

“The potential for La Niña development was included in our updated Atlantic hurricane season forecast issued in August,” he added.

The Girl 2020

PHOTO Twitter

La Niña forms in 2020 and worse hurricanes and forest fires are forecast

What can the US expect with La Niña?

A typical winter La Niña pattern in North America. While the Pacific Northwest tends to be more humid than average, the southern level of the US is usually unusually dry.
In that perspective, meteorologists predicted that up to 25 storms could form in the Atlantic. 17 have already formed, including Hurricane Laura, which devastated parts of southwestern Louisiana in August.

In terms of its impact on wildfires in the west, La Niña tends to cause dry weather in parts of California and much of the Southwest. “We are already in a bad position, and La Niña puts us in a situation where fire weather conditions persist through November and possibly even December,” Ryan Truchelut, president of Weather Tiger LLC, told Bloomberg News. “It is compounding the existing heat and drought problems.”

More than half of the state of California is already in a drought, according to Thursday’s US Drought Monitor.

A typical La Niña winter in the United States brings rain and snow to the northwest and unusually dry conditions to most of the southern United States, according to the forecasting center. The Southeast and Mid-Atlantic also tend to see warmer than average temperatures during a La Niña winter.

PHOTO Twitter

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