UNUSUAL! The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

Foto: archivo / Video: MH
  • It is incredible, but it is true. The names of the list of Atlantic storms have been finished and they are forced to start using the Greek alphabet
  • Tropical Storm Wilfred, the last with a traditional name, formed about an hour before Alpha
  • Wilfred, Alpha and Beta set records as the 21st, 22nd and 23rd named storms to form earlier during the Atlantic season.

It is incredible, but it is true. The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they are forced to start using the Greek alphabet.

The historic and “crazy” Hurricane season The Atlantic received a European twist on Friday after meteorologists ran out of traditional names and began turning to the Greek alphabet for subtropical storm Alpha. And that cyclone in a geographically infrequent place quickly reached Portugal.

But there is still more. Active Atlantic is putting the Greek alphabet to the test after Tropical Storm Beta formed on Friday afternoon. This is just the second time that meteorologists from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) from the United States have had to use names from the Greek alphabet. The first time was in 2005.

Tropical Storm Wilfred, the last with a traditional name, formed about an hour before Alpha, prompting the hurricane center to tweet: “Take out the Greek alphabet.”

UNUSUAL!  The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

Photo: Twitter

And it wasn’t long before they used it again, when a tropical depression in the western Gulf of Mexico became Tropical Storm Beta. There are three storms that formed in a period of about six hours.

“It’s crazy,” said University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy. “It’s through the roof. Breaking records became a joke. “

Wilfred, Alpha and Beta set records as the 21st, 22nd and 23rd named storms to form earlier during the Atlantic season, having emerged weeks earlier than in 2005.

UNUSUAL!  The names of the list of Atlantic storms are finished and they use the Greek alphabet

Photo: National Hurricane Center website

Alpha is weird in another way too. It is located in an area where storms generally do not form. That’s something so unusual that it barely appears on the hurricane center’s storm tracking map, which focuses on the Americas. Only the first two letters of her name can be seen and it is expected to dissipate in less than a day.

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