Two tropical storms formed in the Atlantic: Paulette and Rene

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) of the United States reported that this Monday two tropical storms formed in the Atlantic: Paulette a...

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  • The National Hurricane Center (NHC) of the United States reported that this Monday two tropical storms formed in the Atlantic: Paulette and Rene.
  • Rene is 180 kilometers east of the Cape Verde Islands and is expected to become a hurricane on Thursday morning.
  • Paulette advances towards the Caribbean with maximum sustained winds of 65 kilometers per hour

He National Hurricane Center (NHC) of the United States reported that this Monday two tropical storms formed in the Atlantic: Paulette and Rene.

This Monday, Paulette was formed in the Atlantic and Tropical Depression 18 became Tropical Storm Rene.

Rene is 180 kilometers east of the Cape Verde Islands and, according to NHC forecasts, it will become a hurricane on Thursday morning in the middle of the Atlantic, posing no threat to land. The storm has maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour and is moving west-northwest at 12 miles per hour.

It is expected to produce strong winds and heavy rains on the Cape Verde islands, which will pass near or over them tonight and Tuesday morning.

As for Paulette, it is still very far from the Caribbean, towards which it is advancing with maximum sustained winds of 65 kilometers per hour at a speed of only 5 kilometers per hour in a northwesterly direction. According to the NHC, at 5 p.m. (local time) it was 2,190 kilometers east of the northern part of the Leeward Islands in the Lesser Antilles. Tropical storm winds extend to about 110 kilometers from downtown Paulette and are expected to strengthen in the coming days.

A bit faster and generally westward movement is expected on Tuesday and Wednesday.

For now, the NHC has not issued a notice for land for Paulette.

Photo: National Hurricane Center website

Paulette and Rene are the named storms with the letter “P” and “R”, respectively, formed earlier than the end of the season (November 30) since the record is kept.

The previous records were for Philippe and Rita, who hit hurricanes in the most active hurricane season in history so far, that of 2005.

Two tropical storms formed in the Atlantic: Paulette and Rene

In 2005 there were 27 named tropical storms and one unnamed subtropical storm, a mark that can be surpassed in 2020.

After Rene, only four of the 21 names on the 2020 list remain: Sally, Teddy, Vicky, and Wilfred.

If the cyclones of a season exceed the figure of 21, the number 22 and those that follow will be named after the letters of the Greek alphabet. The last time this happened was in 2005.

Photo: Twitter

Of the storms formed this year in the Atlantic basin, four have become hurricanes (Hanna, Isaías, Marco and Laura) and only one of them, Laura, has been greater (category 3, 4 or 5).

Intense hurricane season looms, experts say

After the passage of Isaiah along the East Coast of the United States, experts say an intense hurricane season is coming.

According to the forecasters, we have not seen anything yet, as there is a high probability that 10 more hurricanes will approach this season.

“We have increased our forecast and now see an extremely active 2020 Atlantic hurricane season,” said Phil Klotzbach.

The meteorologist, who works with a team of specialists from Colorado State University, expects there to be 24 storms during the year. USA Today.

Arthur, Bertha, Cristóbal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzálo, Hanna and recently Isaías, have been the first nine phenomena.

However, forecasters expect 10 storms to come will eventually turn into hurricanes when their winds exceed 74 mph.

“The team predicts that hurricane activity in 2020 will be about 190% of the average season,” explained Klotzbach.

About six hurricanes are regularly expected per season, twice that is expected.

The hyperactive hurricane season is going to get worse

This year’s hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season has already broken several records, but it’s about to get even nastier.

It has been so active that meteorologists hope to run out of traditional names for hurricanes in the coming months, seeing twice the activity than in a normal year, the AP reported.

Intense hurricane season looms, experts say

The hyperactive hurricane season is going to get worse. Photo: AP

 

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office (NOAA for its acronym in English) raised its seasonal forecast and now it foresees 19 to 25 storms, something out of the ordinary. Seven to 11 of them will become hurricanes and three to six will be force majeure, with winds of at least 178 kilometers per hour (111 miles per hour).

“It looks like this season could be one of the busiest on the historical record,” but the 28 storms named in 2005 are unlikely to be exceeded, said Gerry Bell, NOAA’s chief meteorologist.

This year’s forecast of up to 25 storms is the highest number NOAA has ever made, topping 21 in 2005, Bell said.

Based on data from 1981 to 2010, on average there are 12 named storms per year, six regular hurricanes, and three very dangerous hurricanes.

“Everything looks set to be a pretty big year,” said University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy, who said there are likely more storms than names. There are 21 names assigned to a hurricane season, in alphabetical order. If there are more than 21, the meteorologists turn after Wilfred to the Greek alphabet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, etc.

In a normal year, almost 90% of storm activity occurs after August 6. Peak season occurs from mid-August to mid-October. So far this year, there have been nine named storms and most have set a record for arriving early. The most destructive so far has been Hurricane Isaías, which killed at least nine people in August.

Klotzbach said sea surface temperatures in the eastern Atlantic are nearly 1 degree Celsius (2 Fahrenheit) warmer than normal. Not only does that provide more “fuel” for storms, but it changes air pressure and winds to create favorable conditions for storms to form and strengthen, he said.

An extra-quiet Pacific storm season is another indicator of an active Atlantic. When the Pacific is quiet, the Atlantic tends to be much busier as they tend to balance out, explained Kerry Emanuel, a professor of meteorology at MIT.

With information from AP

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