Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas

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Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas
  • Tropical Storm Nicholas made landfall this Tuesday at dawn and since then it has been leaving a trail of destruction in Texas.
  • The system has brought strong winds, heavy rains and threatens to cause flooding.
  • Nicholas knocked down some power lines along the coast, leaving more than 500,000 users without power.

Tropical Storm Nicholas made landfall in the early hours of Tuesday morning and since then it has been leaving a trail of destruction in Texas, as it has brought strong winds, heavy rains and threatens to cause flooding.

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This Tuesday morning, Nicholas made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane in the Matagorda Peninsula in Texas, southwest of Houston, and although shortly after it was downgraded to a tropical storm, its maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour began to cause damage.

Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas

Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas
Photo: AP

In images and videos, the damage that Nicholas has been causing was recorded: he blew the roofs of some gas stations, uprooted trees from the ground and caused a dangerous storm surge of about 4 feet high.

But it is not all. Its strong winds knocked down power lines along the coast, caused serious flooding in League City and Galveston, and even Houston was littered with branches and debris that Nicholas scattered throughout the city.

No power because of Nicholas

Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas
Photo: AP

Even after it came knocking down some power lines along the coast, more than 480,000 users in Texas and more than 93,000 in Louisiana ended up without power, Poweroutage.US explained.

The threat is not over yet and is that almost the entire coast of the state of Texas is still under a tropical storm alert, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) of the United States.

Rains, rains and more rains

Galveston, Texas, this Tuesday morning, September 14. Photo: AP

As long as Nicholas is around, Texas, Louisiana, southern Mississippi, and even Florida will have to deal with rain, rain, and more rain, which becomes dangerous because it could lead to life-threatening flash floods.

Forecasters predict that 6 to 12 inches of water could accumulate on the Texas coast in the next few days and 4 to 8 inches in other areas in the southeast of the state. In fact, already in Galveston they reported almost 14 inches (35 centimeters) of rain and in Houston more than 6 inches (15 centimeters), reported NY Post.

Nicholas weakens heading to Louisiana

Photo: AP

On Tuesday, Tropical Storm Nicholas slowed down and is expected to continue to lose steam into a tropical depression. However, the system continues to move slowly through southeastern Texas and is expected to continue that way through southwestern Louisiana on Wednesday.

Forecasters predict that Nicholas will stagnate over Louisiana, bringing more rain in the coming days to a state seriously ravaged by storms and threatening potentially dangerous flooding.

Active hurricane season

Photo: Shutterstock

The hurricane season remains very dynamic. Nicholas is already the fourteenth named storm to form in the Atlantic in 2021 and could cause even more stages. This Tuesday, the NHC warned that a tornado or two could form in Texas and southwest Louisiana.

So far, five hurricanes have formed in the Atlantic: Elsa, Grace, Henri, Ida and Larry, of which Grace, Ida and Larry have reached a higher category. Meteorologists continue to monitor other systems.

Forecast of active hurricane season in the Atlantic remains

Forecast of active hurricane season in the Atlantic remains
Photo: Twitter

Hurricane season started last June 1. Now, when we go a little beyond the middle, the NOAA Climate Prediction Center reviews and confirms that this 2021 there could be between 15 and 21 named storms and that between 7 and 10 of them could become hurricanes.

Before starting the season, NOAA also warned about the possibility that during this year they will form 3 to 5 major hurricanes, that is, so strong that they could reach categories 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, EFE reported. Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas.

The post Tropical storm Nicholas leaves trail of destruction in Texas appeared first on Hispanic World.