Trendy design: Disruptive lines in a residence

The custom design of this residence takes up two fundamental theoretical principles. They are the free plan and the raumplan, by Le Corbu...

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  • The custom design of this residence takes up two fundamental theoretical principles.
  • They are the free plan and the raumplan, by Le Corbusier and Aldof Loos, respectively.
  • The physiognomy of the residence is achieved with ceilings that emerge from the four walls.

The custom design of this residence takes up two fundamental theoretical principles: the free plan, by Le Corbusier, and the raumplan, by Aldof Loos. From there it creates a light but bold resolution with materiality, color and form. The starting point is the use of cross laminated wood (CTL), an element that due to its malleability allows to exploit the ceiling plane as a way to organize the rest of the architecture.

“A group of six gabled roofs are combined to form a single roof, so that from this, rooms, corridors and double-height spaces are established aligning them with ridges and valleys”, described Jennifer Bonner, director of MALL, office in charge of the project.

CEILINGS EMERGING FROM WALLS

Derived from the tradition of residences built in the southern United States, this proposal takes up the concept known as “false interior”, where the finishes are emulated. Photo: Reform Agency

Precisely, what happens with the physiognomy of the residence is achieved from these ceilings that emerge from the four walls or elevations that give it perimeter and create the irregular inclinations that, cutting together, form a new surface. Achieving this design solution even shows that the slopes are steeper, different from the average standard used in the construction industry.

According to its planning, the 670 square meter house and created in an area of ​​7 meters wide, transfers its gesture with an asymmetric settlement, replacing the traditional house and raising its foundation as if the traditional form were cut out above the sidewalk.

CRAFTY IN CONSTRUCTION

Various windows were placed for the entry of sunlight. Photo: Reform Agency

The experimentation process of this project is not only limited to its approach but also to its material resolution, since since all the walls, floors and ceilings are made of solid CTL panels, it becomes one of the first houses in the United States. United conceived with laminated wood.

According to the architect, it is a material widely used in the construction of that country but of new use in the US market. The most strengthened particularity of this element is its conformation through the juxtaposed use of various layers of wood, which alternate in various directions creating spatial freedom in each of the rooms.

A MONOLITHIC AESTHETIC

Some sides of the house are covered with glass bead stucco. Photo: Reform Agency

“The underside of the gabled roofs create a raised, airy space filled with abundant natural light in what is actually a small building footprint,” said Bonner. Cut to size, hoisted in place and assembled in 14 days, the use of the CLT gives the Haus Gables robustness, avoiding the use of wooden frames.

According to Jennifer, these panels also give the residence a monolithic and uniform aesthetic towards the interior.

DESIGN ON TREND

The interior stands out for the handling of color blocks. Photo: Reform Agency

Ray Eames pieces; Jessica Nakanishi, for MSDS Studio; Stine Gam, for de GamFratesi Studio; Anna Castelli Ferrieri, for Kartell; as well as decorative elements by Annie Hieronimus, for Ligne Roset; Patricia Urquiola, for Glas Italia; and Laurel Consuelo Broughton, for Welcomecompanionsson stand out throughout the house.

Derived from the tradition of residences built in the southern United States, this proposal takes up the concept known as “false interior” in which the finishes were emulated by necessity. The most notable technique is the handling of blocks of color, which is intended to give a contemporary sense for use in the pop trend.

The post Trendy design: disruptive lines in a residence appeared first on Hispanic World.

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