Sam stomps across the Atlantic as a Category 4 hurricane

Sam stomps across the Atlantic as a Category 4 hurricane. Sam could cause dangerous swells and currents by the end of the week on the nor...

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  • Sam stomps across the Atlantic as a Category 4 hurricane.
  • Sam could cause dangerous swells and currents by the end of the week on the northeast coast of the United States.
  • Forecasters expect Sam to keep the same category until the end of the week.

Hurricane Sam gained strength again and reached Category 4 on Tuesday and, while still in the Atlantic Ocean, far offshore, it could cause dangerous tidal waves and currents by the end of the week in the Bahamas, Bermuda and even the northeast coast of the United States, reported the agency The Associated Press.

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Sam’s vortex was about 980 kilometers (610 miles) east of the Leeward Islands and moving northwest at 9 mph (14 km / h), the US National Hurricane Center said early Tuesday morning.

Hurricane Sam could cause dangerous currents in the US

HURRICANE SAM USA
Photo: AP

Its hurricane force winds extended within a radius of 65 kms (40 miles) from the eye. Its maximum sustained winds rose again to 215 km / h (130 mph) to make it a Category 4 hurricane.

There were no active warnings or alerts for the coast and forecasters expect it to maintain the category until the end of the week, as it turns north with a trajectory that would keep its vortex away from the coast.

Aftermath of Sam

Hurricane Sam could cause a "life-threatening swell" along the East Coast
Photo: NHC

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) of the United States reported that in the next few days Sam will move slowly to the northwest and then turn north. “Sam will have a good time in the northeast of the North Leeward Islands on Wednesday and Thursday,” the agency said.

Although Hurricane Sam will stay far from land, storm surges that “could cause potentially deadly swell and rippling current conditions” are expected off the US coast by the end of the week, the NHC warned.

Category 3 hurricane

Hurricane Sam could cause a "life-threatening swell" along the East Coast
Photo: NHC

This Monday at 11 am, Sam was downgraded to a Category 3 hurricane, but it is still a major hurricane. It started as depression 18 and ended up becoming the seventh hurricane of the 2021 season in the Atlantic. Only Grace, Ida, Larry, and Sam have achieved this rating of 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

The experts have not been wrong: this has been a more active hurricane season than normal. So far, seven hurricanes have formed in the Atlantic: Elsa, Grace, Henri, Ida, Larry, Nicholas and Sam.

Sam is a strong but not very intense hurricane

hurricane sam
Photo: Twitter

Of the list of names for 2021, only Victor and Wanda remain to be used and there are still two months of the hurricane season ahead. A slower movement to the west northwest is expected over the weekend, followed by a turn to the northwest on Monday.

Sam is a strong but short hurricane. Hurricane-intensity winds extend up to 15 miles (30 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend up to 60 miles (95 km), the NHC said.

Storm Teresa weakens

hurricane sam
Photo: Getty

Meanwhile, subtropical storm Teresa formed north of Bermuda on Friday. According to the forecast, it had maximum sustained winds of 65 km / h (40 mph) and was about 255 kilometers (155 miles) north-northwest of Bermuda. The meteor, which was moving at about 9 km / h (6 mph), is expected to lose strength throughout Saturday and dissipate on Sunday.

Forecasters noted that Teresa could be the ninth short-lived and relatively weak system of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season, AP reported.

In the Atlantic: Peter and Rose

Storm 18 could become Hurricane Sam this weekend
Photo: NHC

For now, two other systems roam the Atlantic: Tropical Depression Peter and Tropical Depression Rose. The good news is that meteorologists don’t think any of them make landfall.

Of course, special attention will have to be paid to Peter, who threatens to generate heavy rains that could trigger floods this Thursday mainly in the North Leeward Islands, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola.

Bad news: Prognosis remains

An old man died in his car
AP PHOTO

Later in the year, there are no signs that the trend will change, so the forecast remains that this will be an active hurricane season in the Atlantic, reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States (NOAA).

The agency indicated that there do not appear to be significant changes in what they had foreseen for this hurricane season in the Atlantic, so the forecast is maintained that this year they will form until 10 hurricanes.

Forecast of active hurricane season in the Atlantic remains

Forecast of active hurricane season in the Atlantic remains
Photo: Twitter

Hurricane season started last June 1. Now, when we go to the middle, the NOAA Climate Prediction Center reviews and confirms that this 2021 there could be between 15 and 21 named storms and that between 7 and 10 of them could become hurricanes.

Before starting the season, NOAA also warned about the possibility that during this year they will form 3 to 5 major hurricanes, that is, so strong that they could reach categories 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, EFE reported.

Are more hurricanes coming?

Photo: Twitter

Actually, there was a slight increase in the possibilities. In May, NOAA anticipated that they would form between 13 and 20 named tropical storms, as well as between 6 and 10 hurricanes. This time, anticipate that they will form between 15 and 21 named storms, as well as between 7 and 10 hurricanes.

Even so, it does not represent a significant change. “NOAA forecasters maintain an above-average hurricane season forecast for the Atlantic Basin and emphasize the importance of being prepared,” they confirmed through their twitter account.

Staying alert for storms

Photo: archive

Families should prepare for the storm, that’s what Louis W. Uccellini, director of the National Weather Service, recommends. “Now is the time for families and communities to make sure their preparations are in place,” he said.

“These storms can be devastating, so be prepared for all possible outcomes by keeping an eye on the forecast and the following safety information and possible evacuation notifications issued by emergency officials,” he added. Filed Under: Hurricane Sam.

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