New York: Restaurants may charge up to 10% surcharge for the coronavirus

In New York, restaurants will now be able to charge up to 10% surcharge on their customers’ bill due to the coronavirus This measur...

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  • In New York, restaurants will now be able to charge up to 10% surcharge on their customers’ bill due to the coronavirus
  • This measure turns out to be something optional and the owners can decide if they want to include the surcharge or not.
  • Although it may seem like good news for the owners, it ends up being bad for the workers, as there are fears that this surcharge could harm their tips

In New York, restaurants will now be able to charge up to 10% surcharge on their customers’ bill due to the coronavirus.

This Friday, a new regulation came into force in New York City that authorizes restaurants to charge a surcharge of up to 10% on their customers’ bills for costs caused by the Covid-19. This option would be being implemented to try to recover unforeseen expenses due to the pandemic and also to compensate for the adaptation of businesses to a restricted capacity of only 25%.

Although this measure turns out to be something optional and the owners will be able to decide if they want to include the surcharge or not, reported the NY Journal. If you choose to include the surcharge, the establishment must be completely explicit so that the customer identifies where the charge comes from and how much it represents with respect to their total to pay.

This, although it might seem like good news for the owners, ends up being bad for the workers, as it is feared that this surcharge could harm their tips.

New York: Restaurants may charge up to 10% surcharge for the coronavirus

One Fair Wage, a national organization that represents workers in the service sector, regretted that as of today the door was opened for this rule to be implemented.

According to the organization, the tips of the employees could be reduced and they argue that the economic situation has also affected customers, of which 27% have acknowledged that they would leave less tips if they had to pay 10% more. They add that without the new rule, tips have already decreased between 50% and 75%.

“Before the pandemic, tipped workers already had trouble surviving on a sub-minimum wage that forces them to rely on what customers leave to reach the minimum wage,” said Saru Jayaraman, President of One Fair Wage. He also recalled that these people have not only suffered a serious cut in their income, but also that their work exposes them to contact with other people and therefore, to the coronavirus.

On the other hand, in its eagerness to try to help the restaurant sector, yesterday the New York City Council voted “to extend the cookout program until next year + to allow restaurants use portable propane and electric heaters for alfresco dining in these colder months ahead, ”said spokesperson Corey Johnson.

New York: Restaurants may charge up to 10% surcharge for the coronavirus

Photo: Twitter

New York State Announces New COVID-19 Restrictions

New York State authorities have imposed new restrictions on certain places where the coronavirus has increased, such as businesses, restaurants, schools and places of worship, according to The Associated Press.

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the severity of closures will vary based on proximity to hot spots.

New York: Restaurants may charge up to 10% surcharge for the coronavirus

Photo: Twitter.

The new rules will take effect no later than Friday in parts of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, sections of Orange and Rockland counties in the Hudson Valley and an area within Binghamton on the South Level.

The restrictions raised include the closure of schools and businesses in some areas; others will see limitations on meetings and restaurant dinners.

Ultra-religious Jews, whose ceremonies depend on the social congregation, complained about the measures. The Agudath Israel of America organization criticized the decision and denounced that religious practices were being treated unfairly.

The plan marks a considerable step back after a cautious reopening this spring and summer in New York, one of the pandemic’s first hot spots in the US and the deadliest.

While the daily toll dropped dramatically after an increase in March and early April, more than 33,000 New Yorkers in total have died of COVID-19, more than in any other state, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

“It’s about protecting people and saving lives,” said Cuomo, a Democrat, at a news conference in Albany.

In the heart of the hot spots, color-coded as red zones, schools will be closed for in-person learning, only essential businesses could remain open, places of worship could summon no more than 10 people at a time, and restaurants could only offer take out food.

These areas are surrounded by “orange” or “yellow” zones, depending on maps that the state published last Friday afternoon.

In the orange zones, schools will also be only remote and non-essential businesses considered high risk, such as gyms and personal care businesses, will be closed.

Religious institutions must be restricted to 25 people, and restaurants can offer limited cookouts, with a maximum of four guests per table.

In yellow zones, businesses and schools can remain open, with mandatory weekly testing of a yet to be determined percentage of students and teachers.

Religious institutions can operate at half capacity and restaurants can host groups of up to four indoors and outdoors.

Rockland County Executive Ed Day, Republican, said he supported the governor’s plan and would do everything he could to help implement it, calling the restrictions “measured and clearly in focus.”

He urged residents to accept their “civic duty to do the right thing, not just for ourselves, but for our entire community.”

In Broome County, where part of the west side of Binghamton will be subject to the “yellow” zone rules, County Executive Jason Garnar said the restrictions could benefit an area that went from about 60 active cases 10 days ago. at 458 on Tuesday.

“A lot of what we have seen is scattered through restaurants and bars,” said Garnar, a Democrat. He added: “As fast as we got into this, we can get out of this.”

New York City’s rollout is likely to begin Thursday night, according to a tweet from Bill Neidhardt, a spokesman for Mayor Bill de Blasio.

A message seeking comment was left with Orange County officials.

After a harrowing spring, New York boasted a constant and relatively low transmission rate during the summer. But the groups have emerged recently, with an increase in infections.

In New York City, about 11,600 people have tested positive since September 1, compared with fewer than 7,400 in August. In early April, 5,000 to 6,000 people or more tested positive each day.

The city has been averaging about four COVID-19 deaths a day since Sept. 1, compared to nearly 550 a day in April.

The new restrictions came a day after Cuomo ordered school closings in nine Brooklyn and Queens zip codes that have accounted for more than 25% of all new infections in the city over the past two weeks, while accounting for just the 7% of the population.

De Blasio had also proposed closing nonessential deals in those areas, but Cuomo suggested the boundaries should be drawn more broadly.

“We are at a crucial moment in our fight against COVID-19,” the Democratic mayor said in a virtual press conference before Cuomo’s announcement. “We have to contribute everything we can. We have to be tough about it. “

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