Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants

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Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants
  • The city of Los Angeles, in California, will ask its citizens for proof of Covid-19 vaccine to be able to enter stores, restaurants and other commercial premises.
  • The Los Angeles Council approved a new ordinance requiring city residents to show proof of vaccination against Covid-19.
  • The measure will take effect from the next November 4th.

The city of Los Angeles, in California, will ask its citizens for proof of the coronavirus vaccine to be able to enter stores, restaurants and other commercial premises.

This Wednesday, the Los Angeles Council approved a new ordinance requiring city residents to show proof of vaccination against Covid-19 in order to enter cinemas, beauty salons, stores and shopping centers, as well as to eat inside a restaurant.

Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants

Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants
Photo: Shutterstock

The measure will take effect from the next November 4th. From that date, the commercial premises will have the obligation to ask their clients for proof of vaccination before allowing them to enter the establishment.

This rule applies to businesses such as movie theaters, beauty salons, gyms, hairdressers, coffee shops, museums, bars, restaurants, among other companies that will now have to request proof of immunization from anyone who intends to enter their facilities.

An arbitrary ordinance?

The measure will take effect from next November 4
Photo: Twitter

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is one of those who supports the new ordinance, which he even hopes to make into law, according to a spokesman for the Chief of the City Council to the local newspaper Los Angeles Times.

In contrast, councilors John Lee and Joe Buscaino voted against the new rule. Even Lee called this action “arbitrary” and assured that “it will not lead to an increase in vaccinations for residents.” Finally, his opposition was insufficient in a vote that ended 11 votes in favor and 2 against, reported EFE.

Exceptions to the rule

vaccination
Photo: Getty

Of course, there are always exceptions to the rule. In this case, the ordinance establishes several, such as those who for health or religious reasons have not been vaccinated. Even so, they have established for these clients that they present a recent negative test

The other alternative that they offer to these clients is that they be served in outdoor places, such as on restaurant terraces. The ordinance also indicates that the measure will be withdrawn when Los Angeles lifts the emergency declaration for the pandemic.

Rules that go into effect this October 7

Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants
Photo: Twitter

The Los Angeles Department of Public Health had already been promoting some measures such as complete vaccination (one or two doses depending on the brand) or a negative test (maximum 72 hours before) to be able to enter massive events in closed areas from this moment on. October 7.

“REMINDER: Targeted vaccination requirements go into effect October 7!” The department wrote in its twitter account and added that they will also require employees and customers at least one dose to enter bars, discos, lounges, breweries, wineries and distilleries.

Other similar cases

Pfizer Albert Bourla coronavirus vaccine
Photo: AP

This is not the first case. In August, New York became the first city in the United States to pass a similar measure, but it did not prove favorable to the authorities.

Shortly after it was announced, the restaurant owners sued the city because they argued that this measure would negatively affect the finances of their businesses. Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants.

The post Los Angeles will require proof of vaccination to enter stores and restaurants appeared first on Hispanic World.