ICE Hold Orders Decrease During Pandemic

Foto: archivo / Video: MH
  • This Monday, they reported that ICE detainers against undocumented immigrants have decreased during the pandemic.
  • The average use of withhold requests on working days, which is already trending down this year, started to show some reduction as of mid-March
  • However, the courts have found that such detainers alone do not provide legal authority to detain someone.

This Monday, they reported that ICE detainers against undocumented immigrants have decreased during the pandemic.

During the intense months of the coronavirus in the United States, the number of immigration detainers for 48 hours usually issued by the United States was moderately reduced. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Service (ICE) to local law enforcement agencies, which give the federal agency time to take them into custody and begin their deportation process, indicates a report released Monday.

The average use of withholding requests on working days, which is already trending down this year, began to show some reduction as of mid-March, when the COVID-19 pandemic was declared in the nation. At that time the figure fell below 400 a day, and on April 1 it had fallen below 300, indicates the new report from the independent Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) of Syracuse University (New York).

For the second week of April, the daily average fell to around 240, but after mid-April the use of this resource began to increase again. By the end of the first week of May it returned to an average of around 300 retention requests, and by mid-May usage had fully recovered.

ICE Hold Orders Decrease During Pandemic

The document notes that ICE views the retention orders as the basis of its controversial Secure Communities program and has sought to pressure states and localities to comply. Remember that according to ICE, orders to hold an undocumented immigrant in custody are an “essential” tool for detaining and deporting these people.

“Sanctuary” cities like New York do not cooperate with these ICE requests unless they are accompanied by a warrant from a judge or it is someone with a criminal record.

Photo: Twitter

However, the courts have found that such detainers alone do not provide legal authority to detain someone and have imposed financial penalties on law enforcement agencies for violating the constitutional rights of detainees.

Just this week, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors settled a lawsuit in which it agreed to pay $ 14 million to illegally detained people based on ICE requests from the county Sheriff’s Department.

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