Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disaster in its wake

Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disaster in its wake, tIt made landfall as a Category 2 hurricane with strong winds of 105 mile...

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Video MH / Foto AP
  • Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disaster in its wake, tIt made landfall as a Category 2 hurricane with strong winds of 105 miles per hour.
  • There is an alert for the threat of catastrophic and life-threatening floods.
  • Meanwhile, Hurricane Teddy gains strength and could reach Category 4

Hurricane Sally made landfall on the Gulf Coast Wednesday morning as a dangerous storm category 2 with the threat of catastrophic and life-threatening floods, according to ABC.

Hurricane Sally is a Category 2 storm and has winds of 105 mph at 4 am ET. It is now moving north-northeast at just 3 mph with hurricane-force winds along the Gulf coasts of Florida and Alabama. It made landfall around 5:45 a.m. ET near Gulf Shores, Alabama.

The National Weather Service issued an emergency flash flood alert until 8 a.m.ET for parts of Alabama and the Florida Territory, including Pensacola. Parts of Okaloosa and Santa Rosa County, Florida are under emergency alert until 11:45 a.m.

“These advisories are issued for extremely rare situations when a serious threat to human life and catastrophic damage occurs from a flash flood,” the NWS said in a statement Wednesday morning. “This is a life threatening situation. Look for higher ground now. “

Some places have already received as much as 25 inches of rain, which according to the NWS in Mobile, Alabama, could double given how quickly the rain has fallen in a short period of time.

Up to 3 inches of rain may fall per hour within the heavy rain bands north and east of downtown Sally.

Pensacola, where storm surge is reported, is also experiencing wind gusts of up to 75 mph.

“Flooded highways and intersections, along with dangerous road debris (locations), have become too numerous to list,” the Pensacola Police Department said. “Please stay off the roads now.”

The slow-moving storm has already forced some local first responders to stay indoors. The Orange Beach Police Department in Alabama said it could no longer respond to calls due to Hurricane Sally.

Waves crashing near a pier in Gulf State Park, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, in Gulf Shores, Alabama. Hurricane Sally was approaching the coast of the Gulf of Mexico at just 3 kilometers (two miles) per hour, a slow pace that allowed it to monopolize an enormous amount of water to be discharged later on land. (AP Photo / Gerald Herbrt)

Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disasters in its wake

“Current conditions prevent us from answering calls at this time. Please take all steps to be as safe as possible, ”the department tweeted. “If you have the option to move to higher ground, do it now.”

Orange Beach is part of the NWS Flood Energy Alert. More than 179,000 people in Alabama and 67,000 customers in Florida are already without power.

This storm has also triggered several tornado warnings, although no tornadoes have been confirmed yet. A tornado watch remains in effect for parts of Alabama and Florida until 7 am ET.

Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disasters in its wake

Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disasters in its wake – Photo Twitter @ myfox8

Sally gains strength and brings downpours to Florida and Alabama

Hurricane Sally gained strength and struck the northeast strip of Florida and southern Alabama early Wednesday morning with showers, storm surges that covered beaches with water, gales and blackouts, moving towards the coast at a very slow pace that predicted great and perhaps historic floods.

Some 150,000 homes and businesses had been without power by Wednesday morning, according to the site poweroutage.us. A curfew was declared in the coastal town of Gulf Shore, Alabama, due to dangerous conditions.

In Escambia County, on the northeast strip of Florida, Deputy Chief of Police Chip Simmons promised to keep officers on the street for as long as physically possible. The county includes Pensacola, one of the largest cities on the US Gulf of Mexico coast.

“The police will be there until we can no longer be safe, and only then will we withdraw our officers,” Simmons said at a briefing on the storm Tuesday night.

Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disasters in its wake

Sally quickly gained strength as it approached shore, becoming a Category 2 storm with winds of 168 kilometers (105 miles) per hour. As of Wednesday morning, it was 96 kilometers (60 miles) south-southeast of Mobile, Alabama, and was moving north-northeast at 4 km / h (2 miles per hour).

It was expected to make landfall in the northern Gulf on Wednesday morning. The US National Hurricane Center published a map locating the possible entry point between Mobile Bay, Alabama, and the northeast strip of Florida.

Sally was a rare storm that could make history, explained Ed Rappaport, deputy director of the National Hurricane Center.

“Sally has a characteristic that is not seen often, which is a slow forward speed, and that is going to aggravate the floods,” he told The Associated Press.

Rappaport compared the slow progress of the storm to that of Hurricane Harvey, which flooded Houston in 2017. In localized areas, up to 76 centimeters (30 inches) of water could fall, and “that would break a record in some places,” Rappaport said in a interview Tuesday night.

Although the hurricane was heading to the coasts of Alabama and Florida on Wednesday, it was noticeable throughout the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. In southeastern Louisiana, seawater flooded low-lying homes. In Mississipi, the water covered beaches and part of a coastal highway. Two large casino ships came loose from the dock where they were undergoing renovations in Alabama.

Mississippi Governor Tate Reeves urged people in the southern part of his state to prepare for flash floods.

After bringing down the coastal rain on Wednesday, Sally was expected to bring heavy downpours to parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and the Carolina this week.

National Hurricane Center: Teddy gains strength rapidly with winds of 160 km / h and could reach dangerous category 4

National Hurricane Center: Teddy gains strength rapidly with winds of 160 km / h and could reach dangerous category 4.

Tropical Storm Teddy became a hurricane on Wednesday with maximum sustained winds of 160 kilometers (100 miles) per hour, according to the US National Hurricane Center.

The system was expected to gain strength over the next few days, turning into a strong hurricane on Wednesday and perhaps reaching Category 4 on Thursday.

Teddy was 1,335 kilometers (820 miles) east of the Lesser Antilles. Its hurricane-force winds stretched 25 miles (40 kilometers) from its center, and tropical-storm-force winds reached 175 miles (281 km).

Meanwhile, Hurricane Sally was moving slowly towards land and had already left 332,000 homes and businesses without power in Alabama, Florida and Louisiana by Wednesday morning, according to the site poweroutage.us. The website listed about 192,000 of those blackouts in Alabama and more than 78,000 in Florida.

With information from the Associated Press and ABC News.

The post Hurricane Sally makes landfall and causes disasters in its wake appeared first on Hispanic World.

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